4 new cases in San Francisco, 50 SJFD firefighters quarantined

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LATEST, March 12, 10:50 a.m.: At least 50 members of the San Jose Fire Department are being quarantined after a firefighter tested positive for COVID-19. That firefighter is being treated in the hospital, another firefighter is being tested for the virus, while the other 50 or so SJFD employees are monitoring their condition at home.Three TSA officers at Mineta San Jose International Airport also tested positive for COVID-19. Airport officials said Wednesday 42 additional TSA agents who may have been exposed were also on paid leave.Gov. Gavin Newsom said in a Thursday morning press conference the total number of cases of COVID-19 in California jumped to 198. More than half of those cases are in the Bay Area.March 12, 10:08 a.m.: As the number of confirmed coronavirus cases continued to grow around the Bay Area Thursday, public officials expanded efforts to curb the virus’ spread.Four new cases of COVID-19 were detected in San Francisco, bringing the total number to 18 as of 10 a.m. Thursday. Two of the new patients were being treated in the hospital and two were being isolated at home, reported KRON. Three of them are suspected to have contracted the virus through community spread and one person had close contact with a known case, according to KRON.Two new cases were also detected in San Mateo County; the public health department updated its website to reflect 17 in-county cases at 9:32 a.m. (up from 15 on Wednesday), but didn’t immediately provide details on the two new patients.Santa Clara County, the county with the most confirmed cases in the Bay Area —48, as of Thursday morning — declared a state of emergency and ordered the cancellation of all mass gatherings for three weeks. San Francisco Mayor London Breed has done the same in San Francisco. So far, the greatest impact of large gathering cancellations has been on sporting events.Californians can expect more cancellations to come, as Gov. Gavin Newsom issued statewide guidance advising people to cancel even small social gatherings where people can’t stand at least six feet apart.Many private schools around the Bay Area have closed out of an abundance of caution, but public K-12 schools have largely remained open. Lakeshore Elementary in San Francisco is the lone exception thus far; the school will close for at least two weeks after four students and a number of adult family members reported having respiratory illness, the school district said Wednesday night. There are no confirmed cases of COVID-19 at Lakeshore.Most colleges and universities around the Bay Area have made the move to online instruction only for the time being.CALIFORNIA DEATHS: 4Four deaths deaths related to coronavirus in California have been reported.The first occurred in Placer County on March 4. The Placer County Health Department said the deceased is an elderly resident of the county with underlying health conditions. The patient tested presumptively positive on Tuesday, March 3 at a California lab and was likely exposed on a Princess cruise ship that traveled from San Francisco to Mexico, Feb. 11 to 21, health officials said. The patient was under treatment in isolation at Kaiser Permanente Roseville.The second California death, the first in the Bay Area, was reported in Santa Clara County in March 9. A woman in her 60s passed away at El Camino Hospital in Mountain View Monday, the first death tied to the novel coronavirus in the Bay Area. The woman was hospitalized for several weeks, Santa Clara County health officials said.Sacramento County announced on March 10 that a woman in her 90s in an assisted-living facility died from corornavirus. This was the first death in the county and the third in California. Health officials said the patient had an underlying health condition and “died of complications” related to the pneumonia-like virus.Los Angeles County announced the fourth death on March 11: a woman who had traveled extensively (including a layover in South Korea) and who was visiting Los Angeles from out of town.The death of a 72-year-old man from Sunnyvale was previously thought to be linked to COVID-19, but test results confirmed the man did not have the virus.

LATEST, March 12, 10:50 a.m.: At least 50 members of the San Jose Fire Department are being quarantined after a firefighter tested positive for COVID-19. That firefighter is being treated in the hospital, another firefighter is being tested for the virus, while the other 50 or so SJFD employees are monitoring their condition at home.

Three TSA officers at Mineta San Jose International Airport also tested positive for COVID-19. Airport officials said Wednesday 42 additional TSA agents who may have been exposed were also on paid leave.

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Gov. Gavin Newsom said in a Thursday morning press conference the total number of cases of COVID-19 in California jumped to 198. More than half of those cases are in the Bay Area.

March 12, 10:08 a.m.: As the number of confirmed coronavirus cases continued to grow around the Bay Area Thursday, public officials expanded efforts to curb the virus’ spread.

Four new cases of COVID-19 were detected in San Francisco, bringing the total number to 18 as of 10 a.m. Thursday. Two of the new patients were being treated in the hospital and two were being isolated at home, reported KRON. Three of them are suspected to have contracted the virus through community spread and one person had close contact with a known case, according to KRON.

Two new cases were also detected in San Mateo County; the public health department updated its website to reflect 17 in-county cases at 9:32 a.m. (up from 15 on Wednesday), but didn’t immediately provide details on the two new patients.

Santa Clara County, the county with the most confirmed cases in the Bay Area —48, as of Thursday morning — declared a state of emergency and ordered the cancellation of all mass gatherings for three weeks. San Francisco Mayor London Breed has done the same in San Francisco. So far, the greatest impact of large gathering cancellations has been on sporting events.

Californians can expect more cancellations to come, as Gov. Gavin Newsom issued statewide guidance advising people to cancel even small social gatherings where people can’t stand at least six feet apart.

Many private schools around the Bay Area have closed out of an abundance of caution, but public K-12 schools have largely remained open. Lakeshore Elementary in San Francisco is the lone exception thus far; the school will close for at least two weeks after four students and a number of adult family members reported having respiratory illness, the school district said Wednesday night. There are no confirmed cases of COVID-19 at Lakeshore.

Most colleges and universities around the Bay Area have made the move to online instruction only for the time being.

CALIFORNIA DEATHS: 4

Four deaths deaths related to coronavirus in California have been reported.

The first occurred in Placer County on March 4. The Placer County Health Department said the deceased is an elderly resident of the county with underlying health conditions. The patient tested presumptively positive on Tuesday, March 3 at a California lab and was likely exposed on a Princess cruise ship that traveled from San Francisco to Mexico, Feb. 11 to 21, health officials said. The patient was under treatment in isolation at Kaiser Permanente Roseville.

The second California death, the first in the Bay Area, was reported in Santa Clara County in March 9. A woman in her 60s passed away at El Camino Hospital in Mountain View Monday, the first death tied to the novel coronavirus in the Bay Area. The woman was hospitalized for several weeks, Santa Clara County health officials said.

Sacramento County announced on March 10 that a woman in her 90s in an assisted-living facility died from corornavirus. This was the first death in the county and the third in California. Health officials said the patient had an underlying health condition and “died of complications” related to the pneumonia-like virus.

Los Angeles County announced the fourth death on March 11: a woman who had traveled extensively (including a layover in South Korea) and who was visiting Los Angeles from out of town.

The death of a 72-year-old man from Sunnyvale was previously thought to be linked to COVID-19, but test results confirmed the man did not have the virus.